TRADITIONAL ARTIST DEMONSTRATIONS

Each year, the Concord Multicultural features a full lineup of performances, food vendors, craft vendors, artists and activities that represent more than 30 cultures from around the world, presented by folks who live and work locally. 


Traditional arts and folklife are the crafts, music, stories and ways of doing things that are passed on from one generation to the next within families, communities and cultural groups of all types. Here in New Hampshire, the diversity of traditions and heritages span from Native American basket weaving to Chinese paper cutting to Russian Matryoshka Nesting Dolls to Nepali/Bhutanese tabla-playing. 


The Festival features New Hampshire-based traditional artists demonstrating their craft, and a unique opportunity to interact, learn and ask questions! If you are a traditional artist in New Hampshire and would like to present, please contact Kayla Schweitzer: Kayla.Schweitzer@dncr.nh.gov 


We will be posting the list of demonstrations shortly - stay tuned! In the meantime, be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter + Instagram, and sign up for email updates

Bhutanese elders demonstrate traditional weaving techniques at the Concord NH Multicultural Festival
Bhutanese elders demonstrate traditional weaving techniques at the Concord NH Multicultural Festival

Arts Partner

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2019 DEMONSTRATIONS

ABENAKI BASKET WEAVING

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PRESENTED BY LIZ CHARLEBOIS 

In New England, baskets were made by the Native American tribes, which included the Penobscot, Maliseet, Pennacook, Abenaki and Algonquin. They used a variety of local materials including birch bark, the spit wood of ash trees and sweetgrass. When European settlers came to New England in the mid-1600s and 1700s, they brought their own basketry traditions. Over time, basket making traditions intermingled. Today, the skills and basket styles of New Hampshire reflect this shared heritage.

SOUTH ASIAN FEMALE TRADITIONAL ATTIRE (SARI)

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PRESENTED BY NIRMALA SHARMA

The wearing of the Sari serves as the traditional attire and cultural identity of women of South Asian origin. While the Sari is attributed to being worn exclusively by women of South Asia, it is also worn by women all over the world. Consisting of beautiful, vibrant colors such as red, pink, purple and yellow, the Sari is worn for both formal and informal occasions: weddings, parties, ceremonies, office visits and other daily (informal) occasions. In most South Asian countries, the Sari is the official uniform for women in school as dictated by law. After high school, some schools still have the Sari as part of the mandatory dress code but it is not law that it needs to be worn. For example, in Nepal it is law that political practitioners must wear the Sari.

CHINESE FOLK PAPER-CUT ART & CALLIGRAPHY

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PRESENTED BY RUNJUAN HUANG

Chinese folk paper-cut art is commonly made of red paper due to the color’s association with happiness and festivities in Chinese culture. They are used as decoration for festivities, such as the Chinese New Year, weddings or the birth of children, or as an aesthetic way to convey meanings or emotions such as hope, good fortune, a better life, or gratitude. 

PARTICIPATE

Demonstrate a Traditional Art Form

Thank you for your interest in being a demonstrator at the 13th Annual Concord Multicultural Festival! 

It is our goal to create an engaging event that brings people together to celebrate the diverse heritages that make the Greater Concord community so enriching. If you are an artist and would like to demonstrate at the Festival, please contact our Artist Coordinator, Kayla Schweitzer, for more information.


Kayla Schweitzer, Heritage & Traditional Arts Coordinator

New Hampshire State Council on the Arts

Kayla.Schweitzer@dncr.nh.gov

(603) 271-0795

MANY THANKS TO OUR GENEROUS SPONSORS!

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